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Portrait: the art-driven eyewear brand captures beauty in marble

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In a world of emerging high-end fashion players, born after new trends of luxury and beauty
consumption, Portrait pops up as the only eyewear brand carrying art in its veins.


The only label that claims to be entirely related to artistic movements and that promotes new
figures in the contemporary arena. In fact, Portrait has differentiated from the beginning
for designing original and iconic frames that pay tribute to personalities and artists who were
pioneers of their time.


The only label that claims to be entirely related to artistic movements and that promotes new
figures in the contemporary arena. In fact, Portrait has differentiated from the beginning
for designing original and iconic frames that pay tribute to personalities and artists who were
pioneers of their time.


But at the same time, the brand recognises that there’s a target of high worth net individuals
in constant search of premium quality and limited edition pieces, with a strong emotional
content and mastery manufacture.


Furthering art and uniqueness, Portrait has decided to “write it in stone”
by launching a new set of colours that resemble marble in various tones.

Talking about history, marble in architecture reached its diffusion primarily in Greece during
the sixth century, and later in Byzantine and Syria. In the seventh century it spread in Italy
through Byzantium and reached its widespread dissemination in the Renaissance.
The Cinquecento revived a preference for marble, culminating also in some of the most
well-known sculptures in the world.

Like Michelangelo’s work who not only marked an era but also inspired many decades later, the Modern Art movement, with figurative marble
sculptures that remained popular thanks to Auguste Rodin, whose larger-than-life pieces
showcased a level of skill and an anatomical understanding inspired Michelangelo itself, who
“revealed me to myself, revealed to me the truth of forms” (Rodin).

To this matter, combinations of marble-like acetates, shapes, finishes and galvanized steel
recall for all the existing art-inspired lines, the sculpture and architecture world, both antique
and beyond-question forms of art with a certain place in Portraits collection.

Just like today’s sculptors: Kevin Francis Gray, Matthew Simmonds, and Sibylle Pasch, this
colour set decided to go for stone to continue to experiment with art, finding creative ways
to reimagine the craft and put a contemporary twist on classical-like materials.


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