Timberland’s ‘Timberloop’ aims to be a triumph for take-back

Timberland is kicking off the year with the launch of Timberloop, a take-back program to keep the brand’s shoes and apparel out of landfills.
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Timberland is kicking off the year with the launch of Timberloop, a take-back program to keep the brand’s shoes and apparel out of landfills.

The Timberloop take-back program rolls out online and in store at all 85 Timberland full-price and outlet locations across the U.S. At no cost to them, customers can issue take-backs on Timberland items in any condition via the brand’s website by printing out a free shipping label and sending in their product or by visiting the designated drop-off boxes in store.

While customers get a 10 percent discount toward their next purchase, their goods get a second chance.

After take-back, goods are either routed for recycling (and upcycling into new products via Timberland’s partner ReCircled) or refurbishment to be given new life on Timberland’s resale website launching later this spring, according to the company.

Although programs like Nike’s Reuse-a-Shoe have been around much longer, operating since 1993 and repurposing 30 million athletic shoes to date, the service is limited in some aspects. Reuse-a-Shoe is available in 150 stores in North America but not yet apparel.

Meanwhile, Timberloop seeks to edge forward with the capacity for apparel and an added technology stance on circularity.

“Via the digital take-back program, consumers will be able to track their products and whether they were repaired for resale or disassembled for upcycling/recycling,” Susie Mulder, global brand president of Timberland, told WWD. “Ultimately we aim to share the positive environmental outcomes of the consumer’s recycling efforts — in terms of water and energy saved — so they’ll know specifically how they helped to make a difference.”

The European take-back program will roll out in April along with the brand’s circular Timberloop Trekker city hiking shoe and the brand’s dedicated resale site. Asia-Pacific will trail these efforts in 2023, as the brand sets sights on its goal of 100 percent circularity by 2030.

Source: WWD

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